Famous People

Kelly Famous People
Grace KellyGrace Patricia Kelly (November 12, 1929 – September 14, 1982) was an American actress who, in April 1956, married Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, to become Princess consort of Monaco, styled as Her Serene Highness The Princess of Monaco, and commonly referred to as Princess Grace.

After embarking on an acting career in 1950, at the age of 20, Grace Kelly appeared in New York City theatrical productions as well as in more than forty episodes of live drama productions broadcast during the early 1950s Golden Age of Television. In October 1953, with the release of Mogambo, she became a movie star, a status confirmed in 1954 with a Golden Globe Award and Academy Award nomination as well as leading roles in five films, including The Country Girl, in which she gave a deglamorized, Academy Award-winning performance. She retired from acting at 26 to enter upon her duties in Monaco. She and Prince Rainier had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stéphanie. She also retained her American roots, maintaining dual US and Monégasque citizenships.
She died after suffering a stroke on September 14, 1982, when she lost control of her automobile and crashed. Her daughter, Princess Stéphanie, was in the car with her, and survived the accident.

In June 1999, the American Film Institute ranked her No.13 in their list of top female stars of American cinema.

Gene KellyEugene Curran “Gene” Kelly (August 23, 1912 – February 2, 1996) was an American dancer, actor, singer, film director and producer, and choreographer. Kelly was known for his energetic and athletic dancing style, his good looks and the likeable characters that he played on screen.

Although he is known today for his performances in Singin’ in the Rain and An American in Paris, he was a dominant force in Hollywood musical films from the mid 1940s until this art form fell out of fashion in the late 1950s. His many innovations transformed the Hollywood musical film, and he is credited with almost single-handedly making the ballet form commercially acceptable to film audiences.[1]

Kelly was the recipient of an Academy Honorary Award in 1952 for his career achievements. He later received lifetime achievement awards in the Kennedy Center Honors, and from the Screen Actors Guild and American Film Institute; in 1999, the American Film Institute also numbered him 15th in their Greatest Male Stars of All Time list.

Sean Thomas OKellySeán Thomas O’Kelly (Irish: Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh; 25 August 1882 – 23 November 1966) was the second President of Ireland (1945–1959). He was a member of Dáil Éireann from 1918 until his election as President.[1] During this time he served as Minister for Local Government (1932–1939) and Minister for Finance (1939–1945). He also served as deputy prime minister of Ireland from 1932 to 1945, under the title Vice-President of the Executive Council from 1932 until 1937 and Tánaiste from 1937 until 1945. O’Kelly was the first Irish president to visit the United States, from 16–31 March 1959. He was invited to address both houses of Congress.[10] This was important to Ireland as it showed that the new republic and its head of state were recognised by the United States

Sean KellyJohn James ‘Sean’ Kelly (born 24 May 1956)[1] is an Irish former professional road bicycle racer. He was one of the most successful road cyclists of the 1980s, and one of the finest classics riders of all time. From turning professional in 1977 until his retirement in 1994, he won nine monument classics, and 193 professional races in total. He won Paris–Nice seven years in a row and the first UCI Road World Cup in 1989. He won the 1988 Vuelta a España and had multiple wins in the Giro di Lombardia, Milan – San Remo, Paris–Roubaix and Liège–Bastogne–Liège. Other victories include the Critérium International, Grand Prix des Nations and smaller tours including the Tour de Suisse, Vuelta al País Vasco and Volta a Catalunya.

Although Kelly never won the World Road Race Championships, he twice won bronze medals (1982 & 1989) & also finished 5th in 1987, the year compatriot Stephen Roche won gold. Kelly was first to be ranked No.1 when the FICP rankings were introduced in March 1984, a position he held for a record six years. In the 1984 season, Kelly achieved 33 victories.

Ned KellyEdward “Ned” Kelly (June 1854/June 1855 – 11 November 1880)[1] was an Irish Australian bushranger. He is considered by some to be merely a cold-blooded cop killer — others, however, consider him to be a folk hero and symbol of Irish Australian resistance against the Anglo-Australian ruling class.[2]

Kelly was born in Victoria to an Irish convict father, and as a young man he clashed with the Victoria Police. Following an incident at his home in 1878, police parties searched for him in the bush. After he killed three policemen, the colony proclaimed Kelly and his gang wanted outlaws.

A final violent confrontation with police took place at Glenrowan on 28 June 1880. Kelly, dressed in home-made plate metal armour and helmet, was captured and sent to jail. He was convicted of three counts of capital murder and hanged at Old Melbourne Gaol in November 1880. His daring and notoriety made him an iconic figure in Australian history, folklore, literature, art and film.

In August 2011, anthropologists announced that a skeleton found in a mass grave in Pentridge Prison had been confirmed as Kelly’s. Kelly’s skull, however, remains at large.[3]

Patrick Kelly (ca. 1822 – June 14, 1864) was an Irish-American Union Army officer during the American Civil War. He led the famed Irish Brigade at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Kelly was born in Castlehacket, Tuam, County Galway, Ireland, and emigrated to the United States, landing in New York City. His wife Elizabeth was also from Tuam.[1]

At the outset of the Civil War, Kelly enlisted in the Union Army and saw action as captain of Company E of the 69th New York Infantry at the First Battle of Bull Run. He briefly was a captain in the 16th U.S. Infantry. On September 14, 1861, he was named lieutenant colonel of the 88th New York Infantry and fought in the Irish Brigade’s major battles in 1862. He commanded the regiment at the Battle of Antietam. While stationed at Harpers Ferry following the Maryland Campaign, he was promoted to colonel on October 20, 1862. He led the regiment in the ill-fated attacks in front of Marye’s Heights in the Battle of Fredericksburg. Kelly was acting commander of the Irish Brigade at the end of 1862.[2]

After the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville, Kelly was promoted to command the Irish Brigade following the resignation of Brig. Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher. Kelly led the heavily depleted brigade (fewer than 600 men) in an attack at the Wheatfield at Gettysburg. The brigade lost 198 of 532 troops engaged, around 37%.[3]

Kelly resumed his role as colonel of his regiment as more senior officers returned to the brigade. However, with the death of Col. Richard Byrnes at the Battle of Cold Harbor in 1864, Kelly again commanded the brigade. At the age of 42, Kelly died during the Siege of Petersburg when he was shot though the head while leading the Irish Brigade forward against Confederate earthworks. His body was recovered and sent back to New York for his funeral. He was buried in First Calvary Cemetery in Woodside, New York.

Luke Kelly (Irish: Lúc Ó Ceallaigh; 17 November 1940 – 30 January 1984) was an Irish singer and folk musician from Dublin, Ireland, notable as a founding member of the band The Dubliners.

Luke Kelly remains an Irish icon and his music is widely regarded as one of Ireland’s cultural treasures. Kelly’s music was pan-celtic . The influence of his Scottish grandmother was paramount in Kelly’s help in preserving important traditional Scottish songs such as ‘Mormond Braes’, ‘Peggy Gordon’, Robert Burns’ ‘Parcel of Rogues’, ‘Tibbie Dunbar’, Hamish Henderson’s ‘Freedom Come All Ye’, and Thurso Berwick’s ‘Scottish Breakaway’

The Ballybough Bridge in the north inner city of Dublin has been renamed the “Luke Kelly Bridge” and in November 2004, the Dublin city council voted unanimously to erect a bronze statue of Luke Kelly.[3] However, the Dublin Docklands Authority has since stated that it can no longer afford to fund the statue. Councillor Christy Burke of Dublin City Council has appealed to members of the music community including Bono, Phil Coulter and Enya to help build it.[4]

Paddy Reilly has recorded a tribute to Kelly[5] entitled The Dublin Minstrel This features on his Gold And Silver Years, Celtic Collections and the Essential Paddy Reilly CD’s. The Dubliners recorded it on their Live At Vicar Street DVD/CD. The song was composed by Declan O’Donoghue, the Racing Correspondent of The Irish Sun.[6]

Sourced:

Wikipedia.org